Monday, April 12, 2021

And Then ... They Took Us Downstairs! Part 4


In this last part of the windows of the arms of the Knights of the Golden Fleece from the 1559 Chapter of the Order held in St. Bavo's Cathedral in Ghent, Belgium, we see these arms:


Pietro Antonio San Severino, Duke of San Marco: Argent a fess gules a bordure azure.

Maximilian, King of Bohemia, Archduke of Austria (later HRE Maximilian II) (1527-1576): Or a double-headed eagle displayed sable on its breast an inescutcheon: Quarterly: 1, Barry argent and gules; 2, Gules a lion rampant argent; 3, Per pale, Gules a fess argent, and Or two bendlets azure within a bordure gules; and 4, Quarterly: i and iv, Gules a tower or; ii and iii, Argent a lion rampant (purpure).

Charles, Baron de Berlaymont (1510-1578): Barry of six vair and gules.

Cosimo I de' Medici, Duke of Florence (later the first Grand Duke of Tuscany) (1519-1574). Or six torteaux one two two and one the chiefmost Azure three fleurs-de-lis or.

Claude de Vergy, Comte de Gruères (1495-1560): Gules three roses (or cinquefoils) or.

(Yes, there's another coat of arms in the lower right, but it's blocked from view. Sorry!)


Here we have the top windows that specify that these are Knights of the Golden Fleece of the 1559 Chapter. Beneath those windows, we see the arms of:

Iñigo Lopez de Mendoza, 4th Duke of l'Infantado (1503-1566). Per saltire: chief and base, Or the words Ave Maria in chief and Gratia Plena in base sable; in fess, Azure a bend sinister gules fimbriated or. The quarters are reversed in the window from what they ought to be. It may be that the arms were rotated clockwise 45 degrees when they were placed in the window, because if they were rotated 45 degrees counter-clockwise, they would be correct. Feel free to go back a few posts to compare with the stall plate for the Duke.

Friedrich von Fürstenberg (1496-1559): Or an eagle displayed gules a bordure per bordure nebuly azure and argent.

Joachim, Seigneur [lord] de Rye: Quarterly: 1 and 4, Azure an eagle displayed or; 2 and 3, Azure a bend or. (Yes, they did the bend effectively as a bordure here. Just another one of the issues of trying to place quartered arms on a lozenge shape!)

Ponthus de Lalaing, Seigneur de Bugnicourt: Gules ten lozenges conjoined three three three and one argent.

And this concludes our look at the stained glass windows of the arms of the knights of the Order of the Golden Fleece, tucked away in the bowels of St. Bavo's Cathedral.

I hope you have enjoyed this little tour!

Thursday, April 8, 2021

And Then ... They Took Us Downstairs! Part 3


Today we look at the stained glass coats of arms of the Knights of the Golden Fleece from the 1559 Chapter held in the Cathedral, hidden away from the general public's view.

Here again, you can compare these arms to those on the stall plates we looked at earlier. And, of course, you can always click on an image to see a larger, more detailed picture of the arms.


Philippe de Stavele, Baron de Chaumont (1508-1562): Ermine a bend gules.

Andrea Doria, 1st Prince of Melfi (1466-1560): Per fess or and argent two ragged staffs in saltire gules overall an eagle displayed sable.

John III, King of Portugal (1502-1557), Charles V's brother-in-law. Argent five escutcheons in cross azure each charged with five plates in saltire all within a bordure gules semy of towers or.

Ascanio Sforza-Sforza, Count of Santa Fiora (1520-1575): Azure a lion rampant or maintaining in its sinister forepaw a rose or slipped and leaved argent.

Antonio Doria, Marquis of San Stefano: Per fess or and argent an eagle displayed sable crowned or between in dexter chief a demi-sun issuant and in fess two flames gules. (We missed seeing his arms in the stall plates, as it was tucked away out of view from where I was standing to take the picture. Sorry about that!)

Ottavio Farnese, Duke of Parma (1524-1586): Or on a pale gules between six fleurs-de-lis azure an ombrellino surmounted by a pair of keys in saltire or.


Jean de Hennin, 1st Comte de Boussu (1480-1562): Gules a bend or.

Jehan de Luxembourg, Count of Ligny: Argent a lion rampant gules langued and crowned or overall a label of three tags azure.

Jean de Ligne, Comte d'Arenberg (1525-1568): Quarterly: 1 and 4, Or a bend gules; 2 and 3, Argent three lions rampant gules.

Fernando Alvarez de Toledo, 3rd Duke of Alva (1508-1582): Checky of fifteen argent and azure.

Wratislaw von Pernstein (1530-1582): Or a bull’s head cabossed sable ringed or.

Charles de Brimeu, Comte de Meghem (1524/25-1572): Argent three eagles displayed gules.

Next time, we'll finish up these windows. See you then!

Monday, April 5, 2021

And Then ... They Took Us Downstairs! Part 2


Continuing our look at the stained glass windows with the arms of Knights of the Golden Fleece from the 1445 Chapter of the Order, find:



Gules a bend sinister or. (Possibly de Hennin, Seigneurs and Counts de Boussu, whose arms were Gules a bend or, but the dates of their induction and death do not permit them to be members at the time of the Chapters.) A little more likely is that the arms here are a miscoloration and reversal of Jehan de Neufchâtel, Seigneur de Montagu, Gules a bend argent.

Argent a fess sable. Could this be a reversal of the tinctures in the arms of Henry de Borsele, Seigneur of Vere, Count of Grandpre: Sable a fess argent? Given some of the other miscoloration issues in these windows, I think it likely.

Frédéric, called Valeran, Count of Meurs: Quarterly: 1 and 4, Or a fess sable; 1 and 3, Sable a double-headed eagle displayed argent Quarterly: 1 and 4, Or a fess sable; 2 and 3, Azure a double-headed eagle displayed argent.

Florimond de Brimeu, Seigneur of Massincourt, or Jacques de Brimeu, Seigneur of Grigny, or David de Brimeu, Seigneur of Ligny: Quarterly: 1 and 4, Argent three eagles displayed gules; 2 and 3, Argent a bend gules. (It's always tougher to identify a coat of arms when you have several members of the same family as knights of the Order at the same time. Just sayin'.)


André, Seigneur of Humières: Argent fretty sable. (Yeah, I know the field looks gules here, but I suspect that is a result of other factors like impurities in the glass, background colors bleeding through, and/or something similar.)

Jehan de Melun, Seigneur d'Antoing. Azure seven roundels one two one two and one a chief or. The more common arrangement of the roundels is three, three, and one.


Jean bâtard of Luxembourg, Seigneur of Hautbourdin: Argent a lion rampant queue forchy gules debruised by a bendlet sable. (The window has the arms reversed, making the lion “rampant to sinister” and the bendlet a “bendlet sinister”.)

Baudot de Noyelles-Wion, Seigneur of Casteau: Gules three bars gemel overall a label of three tags or. (His stall plate has the bars as argent.) We saw these arms in the previous post, as well.

And finally, to finish off the arms of the knights of the 1445 Chapter:


Jehan, Seigneur of Comines: Gules a chevron or between three escallops argent a bordure or.

Jean II, Duke of Alençon, Count of Perche: Azure three fleurs-de-lis or a bordure gules bezanty. (The bordure should be platy, e.g., semy of roundels argent, and the glassworker made the “roundels” as squares. Well, sure, it’s easier to do it that way in glass!)

Next time, we find arms from the 1559 Chapter of the Order of the Golden Fleece.

Thursday, April 1, 2021

And Then ... They Took Us Downstairs!


Continuing our guided tour of St. Bavo's Cathedral in Ghent, Belgium, we were led into areas of the cathedral that the public generally doesn't see. For example, the rooms where the cathedrals vestments are kept. Which is what my wife, a fiber and textile artist, was especially interested in.

For myself, I was entranced by, and rapidly circumnavigated the rooms to photograph, the windows, which contained many of the coats of arms of the knights of the Order of the Golden Fleece (which we have been reviewing in recent posts).

Of course, they actually made it very easy to tell that these were arms of the knights of the Order:


And, of course, the arms of the Bishop of St. Bavo's Cathedral were prominently displayed in  the windows there. Here's two pictures taken from different angles of the same window:



We have seen these arms elsewhere in the cathedral. The are blazoned: Azure on a lion rampant argent crowned or three bars gules.

And then, of course, there were the arms of the knights themselves. Here's the first batch from the Chapter held in the Cathedral in 1445. (That they all appear on lozenges does not mean that they are women's arms; it was seemingly just an artistic decision to place them in the windows in this shape.)

The identifications of these arms, which you can go back and compare with their stall plates from recent posts - because they don't always match! - are identified in each window from left to right, top to bottom:


Here we see the arms of:

Simon de Lalaing, Seigneur of Santes: Gules ten lozenges conjoined three three three and one or. His stall plate makes the lozenges correctly argent, with the first lozenge charged with a lion rampant gules.

Ruprecht, Count of Virnebourg: Argent seven lozenges four conjoined in fess and three conjoined in fess gules. His stall plate makes the field or.

Philip III (the Good), Duke of Burgundy, Lothier, Brabant, and Limbourg, Count of Flanders, Artois, and Palatine Burgundy (and more, hidden by the shelf; he was also the Grand Master of the Order of the Golden Fleece at the time of the 1445 Chapter): Burgundy overall an inescutcheon Or a lion rampant sable.

Charles of Burgundy, Count of Charolais: Burgundy overall a label of three tags argent.

Next up, we have:


Jehan, Seigneur of Créqui and Canaples: Or a crequier gules.

Argent four pallets gules. Is it possible that these are meant to be the arms of Alfonso V, King of Aragon and Naples: Or four pallets gules (Aragon)? Argent four pallets gules are the arms of the Marquis of Arpajon (inducted as a member of the Order in 1711) and of the Counts of Schaffgotsch (inducted as members of the Order in 1694, 1731, 1739, and 1785). But these inductions are all far too late for either of the Chapters held at St. Bavo’s Cathedral.

Guilbert de Lannoy, Seigneur of Villerval and Tronchienes: Argent three lions rampant vert a label azure. The arms in the window are missing the bordure engrailed gules.

Florimond de Brimeu, Seigneur of Massincourt, or Jacques de Brimeu, Seigneur of Grigny, or David de Brimeu, Seigneur of Ligny: Argent three eagles displayed gules. (Is the thing in the center an escallop sable for difference? I don't know.)


In this window, we see:

Jean VI, Duke de Bretagne [Duke of Brittany] and Count of Montfort Trepassé: Ermine.

Jean IV, Seigneur of Auxy: Checky or and gules.

Franck de Borsele, Count of Ostrevant: Quarterly: 1 and 4, Sable a fess argent; 2 and 3, Gules three zules (or columns) argent.

Jehan de Croy, Seigneur of Tour sur Marne, or Antoine de Croy, Count of Porcéan, Seigneur of Renty: Quarterly: 1 and 4, Argent three bars gules; 2 and 3, Argent three axes gules the two in chief addorsed.

Someone stepped in front of me as I was taking this photograph, so the arms in the lower left are obscured. We will see the hidden arms in the next post.  

Baudot de Noyelles-Wion, Seigneur of Casteau: Gules three bars gemel a label or. (We will see these arms again in our next post.)

Next time, the rest of the arms from the 1445 Chapter placed in these windows.