Monday, November 11, 2019

An Armorial Tomb


Now we come to an armorial tomb set along a wall in Canterbury Cathedral.


As the sign next to it notes, this is:

The Tomb of
WILLIAM
GRANT BROUGHTON
King’s Scholar, Canterbury
FIRST BISHOP
and
METROPOLITAN of AUSTRALIA
1834 -1853

I could copy a lot of stuff off the internet about Bishop Broughton, but really, it's probably a lot easier for both of us if you just look at his entry on Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Broughton_(bishop) (Besides, if you do go to the Wikipedia page, you can see a painting of him, as well a the copy of this tomb (in which he is buried) at St. Andrews Cathedral in Sydney, Australia (in which he is not).

But of course it was the six armorial shields being supported by angels along the side of his tomb which caught my attention. (As always, you can click on one of the images here to see a larger one with more detail.) Going from left to right, we find:


To the left we have the arms of the Diocese of Melbourne (Azure on a chevron argent between in chief a crosier and a palmer's staff and scrip or and in base four mullets of six points one two and one argent an open book proper); and to the right, the arms of the Diocese of Tasmania (Azure, a crosier in bend surmounting a key (wards upwards and outwards) in bend sinister or between four mullets of eight points argent (representing the Crux Australis).



The arms of Bishop William Broughton/Diocese of Sydney (Argent two bars and on a canton gules a cross argent, impaled by Azure four mullets of eight points in cross argent). The arms on the sinister side of the shield (to the viewer's right) were granted on February 22, 1836 to Broughton as the first Bishop of Australia, and later on November 10, 1967, to the diocese of Sydney. This same shield is shown in the Broughton windows in St. James’ Church, Sydney, and in St. John the Baptist’s Church, Ashfield, except that those reverse the two sides in the more generally accepted pattern, placing the Diocesan arms to dexter (the viewer’s left) and the Broughton arms to sinister (the viewer’s right).

Diocese of Aukland, New Zealand, Azure three mullets of eight points one and two argent.


The arms to the left may be a version of the Anglican Church of Australia, which were granted in 1967 and are blazoned Azure on a cross gules fimbriated argent a mitre or between four mullets of eight points argent. The version here, which precedes the grant by over a century, places a crosier on the cross behind the mitre, and moves the four mullets to the field around the cross.

Cecil Humphrey-Smith identifies this shield as the arms of the Diocese of Adelaide, Argent on a cross between four estoiles gules a pastoral staff overlaid by a mitre or.

The second coat is the arms of the Diocese of Newcastle: Gules a pastoral staff enfiled with a ducal coronet or all within a bordure sable semy of billets palewise argent. (The billets on the bordure are very hard to see here, but if you look closely at a larger image, they are there.)

All in all, a nice display of heraldry from the Antipodes.

Thursday, November 7, 2019

A (Comparatively) Simple Armorial Memorial


This next armorial memorial in Canterbury Cathedral is a comparatively simple one, and yet I can't help but think it holds every bit as much love and pathos as many of the larger, more complex ones.


Near this place
lies the Body of JOHN PORTER
of WANDSWORTH in the County of Surry Esqr.
He departed this Life
the 22d of March 1764, Aged 67.
He married CATHERINE
Daughter of
Lieut. General SUTTON
by whom he left
One Son and Five Daughters.

Requiescat in Pace.

John Porter of Allfarthing, married Catherine Sutton, daughter of Lt. Gen. Richard Sutton, and by her had six surviving children. The manor of Allfarthing, in Wandsworth (London), had been granted by James VI and I to his son Charles, apparently with a view toward it being given to Endymion Porter. Thomas Porter, son of Endymion, had a remainder interest but debt problems of his father caused the loss of the manor in 1652. Thomas Porter's brother, George Porter, recovered the manor and it descended to John Porter of Allfarthing, who was lord of the manor in 1723 when he married Catherine Sutton.

Still, it was the arms at the top of the memorial plaque which caught my attention.


This marital coat of arms is blazoned: Sable three porter’s bells argent and a canton ermine (Porter), impaled by Argent a canton sable (Sutton).

I find it interesting that both the husband's and the wife's coats of arms contain a canton; this is something that is not commonly seen. A canton is a rare enough charge; to find two of them must be very rare.

They did seem to go in for some pretty florid shield shapes in the late 18th Century, though, didn't they?

Monday, November 4, 2019

Three Armorial Memorials Without Personal Heraldry


I've grouped these next three armorial memorials together because, while they have heraldry of a sort on them, none of them bear the personal arms of the person memorialized.

First, we have the memorial to Maj. Gen. Henry J. Degacher:


To the Memory of
Henry James Degacher,
Major General in H: M: Service,
Companion to the Order of the Bath,
Colonel of the 24th
South Wales Borderers Regiment,
Commanded 3rd East Kent
Regimental District 1882~1887.
Born 24th Feb: 1835 ~ Died 25th Nov: 1902.

The heraldic portion of the memorial plaque consists of the badge of the 24 Regiment of Foot South Wales Borderers:


The Regiment has had a long and distinguished existence, much of which is outlined in its Wikipedia page at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Wales_Borderers. Early in its history, it was deployed to Egypt in the aftermath of the Battle of Abukir in March 1801. During the Anglo-Zulu War, it also took part in the battles of Isandlwana (dramatized in the 1979 movie Zulu Dawn) and Rorke's Drift (immortalized in the 1964 movie Zulu).

The Regimental Badge bears the figure of an Egyptian sphinx couchant atop a rectangle with the word "Egypt" all within a laurel wreath bearing the letters "SWB".

The next memorial is to a number of the officers (both commissioned and non-commissioned) and unnamed men of the "Rank and File" of the 3rd East Kent Regiment ("The Buffs").


In
Memory of
Lieutenant & Adjutant G.A. Colvill,
Lieutenant T.F.C. Armstrong,
Sergeant and Orderly Room Clerk S. Julian,
And 12 Rank and File,
Who died whil’st serving with the 1st Battalion
3rd (East Kent) Regiment “The Buffs” in the Campaign
In the Malay Peninsula, in 1875 and 1876.
Also in memory of
Captain H.J.M. Williams,
Lieutenant C.E. Mason, 2nd Lieutenant G.R.J. Evelyn,
And 27 Rank and File,
Who died whil’st serving with the 2nd Battalion
3rd (East Kent) Regiment “The Buffs” in the Zulu War,
South Africa, of 1878 and 1879.

This monument is erected by the officers,
non-commissioned officers and men
of the Regiment,
1881.

More information about the Regiment can be found in its Wikipedia article at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffs_(Royal_East_Kent_Regiment)


The badge of The Buffs is a crest, Atop a torse a dragon passant. Beneath the dragon is a scroll with the words "The Buffs"; beneath that scroll is another with the motto of the Regiment, Veteri frondescit honore (Its ancient honor flourishes).

Our final memorial is to Lt. Col. R.C. Cokayne-Frith, Major of the 15th "The King's" Hussars.


To the Memory of
Lieut. Colonel R.C. Cokayne-Frith
Major 15th “The King’s” Hussars.
Born 17th June 1863.
Died 16th September 1900.
From the result of an accident at Canterbury,
Whilst commanding the Cavalry Depot.

This memorial is erected by his brother officers
as a token of their love and respect.

Once again, more information about this Regiment can be found at Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/15th_The_King%27s_Hussars


The badge of the 15th "The King's" Hussars is a crown atop which is a lion statant guardant all within the garter of the Order of the Garter, which bears the phrase honi soit qui mal y pense. Below these elements is a scroll with the words "The King's XV Hussars".

None of these are, strictly speaking, heraldry, but they certainly are heraldic in the sense that they are each a visual representation of a regiment of HM Armed Forces, as well as a token of the esteem in which the men they memorialize were held by the men with whom they served.